School of Law

Dr Lindiwe Maqutu

Telephone: +27 31 260 3913
Email maqutul@ukzn.ac.za
Campus: Howard College
Building & Room: Howard College Building Suite D Room 126.
 

Biography

Lecturer and Advocate of the High Court, Maqutu obtained a Bachelor of Arts (BA) and Bachelor of Laws (LLB) degrees in 1994 and 1996 respectively from the then University of Natal. She went on to complete a Master of Laws (LLM) degree in Medical Law 2010 and another LLM degree in Constitutional Litigation in 2012 at UKZN. She completed her PhD in 2020. The title of her thesis was ‘The Postcoloniality of Labour Law: A South African Perspective.’ She spent more than 15 years in legal practice primarily in criminal litigation, prior to joining the School of law.

 

She has a keen interest in the plight of the marginalised members of South African communities and the manner in which the law has historically been a barrier to their access to resources and to the realisation of their full potential.

 

Academic Qualifications:

  • BA (Natal)
  • LLB (Natal)
  • LLM (Medical Law)
  • LLM (Constitutional Litigation)
  • PhD

 

Professional Qualification:

  • Advocate of the High Court, South Africa
  • Advocate of the High Court, Lesotho

Research Interests:

  • Critical Jurisprudence
  • Labour Law
  • Postcolonial Studies
  • Decolonisation
  • Revisionist Historiography
  • Constitutional Law
  • Medical Law

Recent Publications and Papers

  • LN Maqutu ‘The Concept of Law in South African Law’ (2020) 26(1) Fundamina: Journal Of Legal History 42
  • L Maqutu & S Motloung ‘Hidden Racial Attitudes in the Workplace: An Evaluation of Bester v Rustenburg Platinum Mine (2018) 34 SAJHR 254
  • L Maqutu ‘When the Judiciary Flouts of Powers: Attenuating the Credibility of the National Prosecuting Authority’ (2015) 18 PER 2671
  • L Maqutu ‘Collective Misconduct in the Workplace: Is “Team Misconduct” “Collective Guilt” in Disguise?’ (2014) 3 Stellenbosch Law Review 566
  • YA Vawda & LN Maqutu ‘Neonatal circumcision – violation of children’s rights or public health necessity?’ (2011) 4 SAJBL 36